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I started working on my ancestry about a year and a half ago. I am still going strong. I continue to discover new things about my relatives and new sources of information. I don’t think anyone can really be done with a project like this. There are too many online sites and many personal sources to consult. I have come to appreciate the online communities participating in the activity; many individuals are so eager to help others. I have been documenting my Ancestry on both ancestry.com and on my personal ancestry site. I created this second site so that a) I wouldn’t have to pay Ancestry $40 a month for the rest of my life and b) I could add a narrative to each relative as information was told to me by relatives. My personal site underwent a hosting transfer and it got accidentally deleted earlier this year. What a pain. I had to build all of the pages and link the points on the map again. But, this unfortunate event helped me to see points of risk and develop a better process. I am adding all of the photos in Google Photos and use a plug-in to easily pull them into posts (just like on this blog).

I am interested in my ancestry because it is helping to learn more about myself. Half of my family (my father’s) is from Sicily and the other half (my mother’s) is from Poland. Ancestry confirmed this split this year after I participated in Ancestry DNA. No surprises, half and half, as I’ve been told my entire life. Some parts of the family have been harder to document than others. I don’t have much information on my father’s father, for example, even though he was born in my state and even though my grandmother is still alive. My mother’s side has been difficult to track I think because of the state of Poland throughout history and throughout wars. Little by little, I continue to research… and cook.

Our CSA recently gave us three quarts of strawberries. As it turns out, it is really hard to eat three quarts of strawberries between two people. I was searching online for a good strawberry jam recipe that incorporated something from my herb garden. I found a recipe on Luci’s Morsels that sounded easy enough, but I made one tweak to it. I have been trying to get away from sugar, and honey is touted as one alternative. I decided to try it with some local honey. The next time I make it, I might also try adding cinnamon. Cinnamon does a great job with grounding most fruits and it compliments honey really well. This is a small batch recipe that makes about two pints. Enjoy!

Print Recipe
Strawberry Thyme Jam
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 2 cups strawberries chopped
  • 3 tsp thyme leaves
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1/8 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 oz. fruit pectin
  • 3/4 cup honey
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
2 pints
Ingredients
  • 2 cups strawberries chopped
  • 3 tsp thyme leaves
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1/8 tsp lemon juice
  • 1 oz. fruit pectin
  • 3/4 cup honey
Instructions
  1. Add strawberries to a large pot. Stir in thyme leaves, lemon zest, lemon juice and fruit pectin.
  2. Begin to heat on medium.
  3. When the mix warms, mash the strawberries using a potato masher.
  4. Stir occassionally, until it comes to a boil.
  5. Stir in honey.
  6. Bring mixture to a rapid boil and boil mix for 2 minutes.
  7. Remove pan from heat and let cool.
  8. Fill jars with jam and refrigerate if not canning.