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More and more people in my family are turning to a gluten-free lifestyle. It is sad that these individuals can’t partake in eating Naan bread – the small slice of heaven on earth. Makki Ki Roti is an alternative. This simple recipe uses cornmeal and water as a base with the traditional addition of turmeric, a dried substance from a plant in the ginger family. Tumeric has a beautiful color and an earthy flavor. Besides fighting inflammation, it is also a brain booster and cancer fighter- two things everyone needs! Makki Ki Roti is a dense ‘bread’, but very easy and quick to make.

To be clear, I don’t necessarily believe that gluten-free is a thing in the way we traditionally define it. I believe it is an unfortunate side effect of messing with the grain (i.e. chemically enhanced processes). When I am shopping in a grocery store, I go for Bob’s Red Mill products. I can always see, smell, and taste the difference. We also order from Anson Mills, founded by Glenn Roberts, an amazing man committed to diversifying grain and bringing back grains that had gone extinct (if you haven’t watched the Mind of a Chef episodes that feature him, go do that). If you are currently living a gluten-free lifestyle, I encourage you just to try these options to see if it makes a difference.

 

Print Recipe
Makki Ki Roti (a gluten-free answer to flatbread)
Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
6 rotis
Ingredients
  • 2 cups cornmeal (I used Anson Mills white cornmeal)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil (more for the pan)
  • 1 cup water (more or less to get a thin or thick roti)
  • 1 tsp tumeric
Prep Time 2 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
6 rotis
Ingredients
  • 2 cups cornmeal (I used Anson Mills white cornmeal)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil (more for the pan)
  • 1 cup water (more or less to get a thin or thick roti)
  • 1 tsp tumeric
Instructions
  1. Heat some oil in a pan on low.
  2. Mix all the ingredients together.
  3. You may wish to roll 'pancakes' out in between two pieces of plastic wrap or simply ladle a thinner 'dough' in the pan.
  4. Heat the rotis like a pancake until brown on both sides and cooked all the way through.
Recipe Notes
  • This is a strange 'dough' that doesn't exactly act like a regular flour dough. You can use a ladle to pour it into the pan, if easier.
  • You can add different flavors to your roti, such as sliced garlic or make it sweet with cinnamon and raisins.
  • Pair the rotis with currys and other Indian dishes.